Science

Science KS3 – Year 7

Year 7 are studying a new revised two year curriculum to meet National Curriculum changes from September 2014.
The new Scheme is based around the APE house, a fictional house where, Application of knowledge, Prior Knowledge and Extension all contribute to students making outstanding progress in science.

The science is linked to the context of the house, with one room being the focus of each half term. Teaching in this way engages the students by allowing them to see how science is all around them and its relevance to everyday life.

 

Modules/Units

The room
Key areas covered
Kitchen
Particles and water cycle.
Living room
Electricity, energy and respiration.
The study
Elements, compound and reactions
Nursery
Cells and Reproduction
The attic
Space, magnetism and static electricity
The gym
Forces including friction, the Cardiovascular system, fitness and health.

 

Year 8 modules (from September 2015)

The room
Key areas covered
Garden
Rocks, neutralisation, biodiversity
Garage
Material properties, speed, energy resources
The bathroom
Separating mixtures, pressure, conduction
Teenagers room
Digestion and diet, sound
The greenhouse
Photosynthesis, food chains and light
The house
Recap, preparation for end of KS3 assessment and GCSE.

 

How pupils are to be assessed

Students will be assessed with 2 skills assessments per half term, which are linked to the scientific knowledge, but are assessed on their scientific enquiry skills, such as planning, presenting, analysis or evaluation.
Students will have a summative text at the end of each half term and regular homework.

 

 

Science KS3 – Year 8/9 (current model)

Year 8 are studying our new revised two and a half year curriculum, which allows them time to complete a series of KS4 bridging units from January in year 9.

The science students learn is from biology, chemistry and physics, with a heavy focus on scientific enquiry skills being developed alongside the development of knowledge. Students cover3 units from each discipline, one each term so they are experiencing a balanced curriculum.

Modules/Units

Year 8
Term 1 – Differences, The Periodic Table, Heating and Cooling.
Term 2 – Light Support, Chemical Reactions, Space.
Term 3 – People and the Environment, rocks, Sound.
Year 9
Term 1 – Keeping Healthy, Light, Shaping Behavior and Forces.
Term 2 and 3 – GCSE Bridging units, covering key concepts which are vital to good understanding of GCSE topics.

How pupils are to be assessed

Each of the topics will have a skills assessment, which is based on scientific knowledge but is assessed on scientific enquiry skill, and a summative test. There will be an end of year/Key stage assessment which consolidates learning in all units.

 

 

Edexcel GCSE Science A (Core science)

Levels of Qualification
1 GCSE A*-G
Course Description
This course is designed to recognise the impact of Science in everyday life. It will allow the learners to make informed decisions about issues that involve science, and help them to understand the information that they will be supplied with. It is expected that learners in Pathway P will follow this course. The course will be taught in the following 3 modules:

B1 – Influences on life (25%)
• Topic 1 Classification, variation and inheritance
• Topic 2 Responses to a changing environment
• Topic 3 Problems of, and solutions to a changing environment
C1 – Chemistry in our world (25%)
¥ Topic 1 The Earth’s sea and atmosphere
¥ Topic 2 Materials from the Earth
¥ Topic 3 Acids
¥ Topic 4 Obtaining and using metals
¥ Topic 5 Fuels
P1 – Universal Physics (25%)
¥ Topic 1 Visible light and the Solar System
¥ Topic 2 The electromagnetic spectrum
¥ Topic 3 Waves and the Universe
¥ Topic 4 Waves and the Earth
¥ Topic 5 Generation and transmission of electricity
¥ Topic 6 Energy and the future

Knowledge and Skills

This emphasises scientific literacy – the knowledge and understanding which students need to engage, as informed citizens, with science-based issues. This qualification uses contemporary, relevant contexts of interest to candidates, which can be approached through a range of teaching and learning activities. Students will be provided with regular opportunities to engage with each other to promote communication skills, they will also be encouraged to develop valuable independent learning skills. Student’s tolerance and respect for each other will be actively encouraged as will their beliefs and points of view.

Assessment

The assessment for this course will include;
3 x 1hour written examinations 75% of final mark
• This unit is assessed through a one hour, 60 mark, tiered written examination, containing six questions.
• The examination will contain a mixture of question styles, including objective questions, short answer questions and extended writing questions.
Controlled Assessment 25% of final mark

Coursework

The learners will submit one full controlled assessment which will be marked internally and then moderated externally. The tasks that they do will be based around the topics covered in lessons. To help with planning and to develop skills, we have embedded a small number of practical investigations into the theory units. The benefits are twofold:
• Development of knowledge and skills can happen simultaneously
• A mix of theory and practical learning is more likely to lead to secure acquisition of knowledge and skills.
Homework
The course is taught over 4 lessons a week during Year 10. Homework will be set twice a week for at least a 30 minute period of study.

Progress Routes

This course will run in Year 10 and will allow students to follow Additional Science in Year 11.

Edexcel GCSE Additional Science A
Levels of Qualification
1 GCSE A*-G

Course Description

This is designed to build upon the knowledge base that the learners will have developed during Year 10. It will allow the learners to make informed decisions about issues that involve science, and help them to understand the information that they will be supplied with. It is expected that learners in Pathway P will follow this course. This course will be taught in the following 3 modules:

B2 – Components of life
• Topic 1 The building blocks of cells
• Topic 2 Organisms and energy
• Topic 3 Common systems
C2 – Discovering Chemistry
¥ Topic 1 Atomic structure and the periodic table
¥ Topic 2 Ionic compounds and analysis
¥ Topic 3 Covalent compounds and separation techniques
¥ Topic 4 Groups in the periodic table
¥ Topic 5 Chemical reactions
¥ Topic 6 Quantitative chemistry
P2 – Physics for your future
¥ Topic 1 Static and current electricity
¥ Topic 2 Controlling and using electric current
¥ Topic 3 Motion and forces
¥ Topic 4 Momentum, energy, work and power
¥ Topic 5 Nuclear fission and nuclear fusion
¥ Topic 6 Advantages and disadvantages of using radioactive materials

Knowledge and Skills

This emphasises scientific literacy – the knowledge and understanding which students need to engage, as informed citizens, with science-based issues. This qualification uses contemporary, relevant contexts of interest to candidates, which can be approached through a range of teaching and learning activities. Students will be provided with regular opportunities to engage with each other to promote communication skills, they will also be encouraged to develop valuable independent learning skills. Student’s tolerance and respect for each other will be actively encouraged as will their beliefs and points of view.

Assessment

The assessment for this course will include;
3 x 1hour written examinations 75% of final mark
• This unit is assessed through a one hour, 60 mark, tiered written examination, containing six questions.
• The examination will contain a mixture of question styles, including objective questions, short answer questions and extended writing questions.
Controlled Assessment 25% of final mark

Coursework

Coursework is again a controlled assessment. The learners will need to complete one full controlled assessment during the year which will be marked internally and then moderated externally. The tasks that they do will be based around the topics that they are doing in lessons.

Homework

The course it taught over 5 lessons a week during Year 11. Homework will be set twice a week for at least a 30 minute period of study.

Progress Routes

This course will run in Year 11 and will allow students to follow any of the A-Level Science routes if they achieve a minimum of B grades in the Science and Additional Science GCSEs.
Edexcel GCSE Biology
Edexcel GCSE Chemistry Triple award Science Edexcel GCSE Physics
Levels of Qualification
3 x GCSE A*-E

Course Description

Learners in Pathway E will follow the Triple Award Science Suite. This will allow learners to achieve 3 GCSE’s in Science subjects. It will provide a more in-depth understanding of the three subjects. Students will study all three science areas over a two year period.

B1 – Influences on life
C1 – Chemistry in our world
P1 – Universal Physics
B2 – Components of life
C2 – Discovering Chemistry
P2 – Physics for your future
B3 – Using Biology
C3 – Chemistry in action
P3 – Application of Physics

Knowledge and Skills

Provides an opportunity for further developing an understanding of science explanations, and how science works.

Assessment

The assessments for the triple sciences are the same for each of the three subject areas: Unit 1 examination – 25 %
Unit 2 examination – 25% these will have to be done for each of the 3 Unit 3 examination – 25 % subjects
Controlled assessment – 25 %

Coursework

Coursework will take the form of a controlled assessment for each subject. Therefore a student will produce 3 pieces, one for each of Biology, Chemistry, and Physics.

Homework

The course it taught over 6 lessons a week during Year 10 and 11. Homework will be set at least once a week for each subject.

Progress Routes

This course will run in Year 10 and 11, and will provide students with the best preparation for A-Level Biology, Chemistry, and Physics.
Stretch and challenge
¥ Students can be stretched and challenged in units through the use of different assessment strategies, for example: using a variety of stems in questions – for example analyse, evaluate, discuss, compare, describe, explain
¥ ensuring connectivity between sections of questions
¥ a requirement for extended writing
¥ use of a wider range of question types to address different skills –for example open-ended questions, case studies, etc.

 

 

Edexcel BTEC Level 1/Level 2 First Award in Principles of Applied Science Edexcel BTEC Level 1/Level 2 First Award in Applicationsof Applied Science

Levels of Qualification
2 x Pass/Merit/Distinction
Course Description
Learners in S Pathway and some learners in P Pathway will follow the BTEC Science courses. Students will produce portfolio work demonstrating their knowledge of topics from Biology, Chemistry and Physics, and will then complete 2 exams. Students will achieve 2 qualifications in Science.

Principles of Applied Science

Unit 1 – Principles of Science – Externally examined Unit 2 – Chemistry and our Earth – Portfolio
Unit 3 – Energy and our Universe – Portfolio
Unit 4 – Biology and our Environment – Portfolio Applications of Applied Science
Unit 5 – Application of Chemical Substances – Portfolio
Unit 6 – Application of Physical Science – Portfolio Unit 7 – Health Applications of Life Science – Portfolio Unit 8 – Scientific Skills – Externally examined

Knowledge and Skills

Provides an opportunity for the learners to use Science issues in an applied context and use the knowledge they gain to present information in a manner easy to understand by others.

Assessment

The assessments for the BTEC sciences are the same for each of the two awards: Unit 1/8 examination – 25%
Unit 2/5portfolio – 25% Unit 3/6portfolio – 25 %
Unit 4/7 portfolio – 25 %

Coursework

As 75% of the course is portfolio based, this makes up the coursework content.

Homework

The course it taught over 5 lessons a week during Year 10 and 11. Homework will be set at least twice a week.

Progress Routes

This course will run in Year 10 and 11, and will provide students with a good preparation for Level 3 courses at college.

 

 

KS5

Applied Science is a course which uses new and existing scientific knowledge and puts it in to a context outside the classroom – applying the science to real life situations.

This course looks in particular at the work done by scientists in a range of organisations, allowing you to gain understanding of the knowledge and skills they require, as well as developing your understanding of how scientific investigation is carried out in a lab.
You will need to complete research assignments on varying areas of science and asked to carry out practical activities as though you were an analytical scientist.

Modules/Units

Science at Work – 1/3 of overall AS Grade.
This unit is split in to two main areas:
Reporting on science in the workplace by visiting a range of industries and compiling reports on the science used and the work carried out as well as considering both the Health and Safety legislation linked to the work undertaken and the impacts the industry has on a society.
Carrying out scientifically based lab research linked to a contextual setting where procedures must be researched, planned risk assessed and the data generated is concluded and evaluated.
THIS UNIT IS AN INTERNALLY ASSESSED PORTFOLIO.

Analysis at Work – 1/3 of overall AS Grade.
This unit focused on how scientists collect and manipulate data, both in the lab and from secondary sources.
A range of scenarios requiring a range of analysis techniques to be used must be completed with detailed research plans, risk assessment and data calculations. Students will also complete secondary research in to energy consumption within a large organization and how the organization is working towards being ‘greener’.
THIS UNIT IS AN INTERNALLY ASSESSED PORTFOLIO.

Monitoring the Activity of the Human Body – 1/3 of overall AS Grade.
This unit teaches students about how the body functions under normal circumstances and how that is monitored. It also considers the impact of the body not functioning correctly and how specialist such as medics, physiotherapists and radiologists would know.
THIS UNIT IS EXTERNALLY EXAMINED.

Investigating the Scientists work – 1/6 of overall A2 Grade.
This unit focusses on the procedure scientist use when collecting evidence and publishing their findings in a journal.
The students will have a research area for which they must collect secondary evidence, devise a hypothesis and method to test it, collect and conclude data. This evidence is then supported by a 2000 word report to summaries their investigation. All work is submitted not just the report.
THIS UNIT IS AN INTERNALLY ASSESSED PORTFOLIO.
The Mind and the Brain – 1/6 of overall A2 Grade.
This unit looks at the functioning of a healthy brain and a brain affected by drugs, mental illness and disease.
Students also complete an investigation into one area of cognition, looking at the impact if age, gender or intelligence level on a cognitive skill such as memory.
THIS UNIT IS AN INTERNALLY ASSESSED PORTFOLIO.

Sampling testing and processing – 1/6 of overall A2 Grade.
This unit teaches students about a range of analytical techniques used by scientist working in the field and in the lab. Students are required to know about how and why samples are selected, decided on a suitable method for testing the sample and how to process the results obtained. The exam is heavily based on pre-release material containing a series of articles upon which the questions are based.
THIS UNIT IS AN EXTERNALLY ASSESSED EXAM.

How pupils are to be assessed

AS LEVEL – 2 UNITS ARE INTERNALLY ASSESSED PORTFOLIOS
1 UNIT IS AN EXTERNALLY ASSESSED EXAM.
A2 LEVEL – 4 UNITS ARE INTERNALLY ASSESSED PORTFOLIOS
2 UNITS ARE EXTERNALLY ASSESSED EXAMS.

This course allows lots of opportunity for full class discussion, smaller group work and paired work. During practical based activities students will be paired up often allowing a less confident student to be supported by a more confident student.

As the student work is portfolio based for 2 units it is vital that they are producing high quality work independently, so after group discussions and sharing of ideas pupils will produce their own reports, developing the ideas in their own way.

Exam Board: OCR

The weighting of each module towards overall grade:
ALL UNITS HAVE AN EQUAL WEIGHTING IN THE AS and A2.

Details of any coursework:
Unit 1: 4 work place reports, 1 health and safety study, 1 impacts on society report, 2 lab reports
Unit 2: 1 energy policy report, 1 energy resource comparison report, 3 lab reports, (qualitative, quantitative and chromatography)
Unit 4: 1 full investigation including background research, plan, data, analysis, conclusion, evaluation and report)
Unit 5: series of leaflets about the brain and stress, report on techniques involved in studying the brain, leaflets on memory, report on eyewitness testimony, investigation in to cognition.


Subject: Biology
KS5

Biology is a course designed to be delivered in an integrated fashion. It makes clear links with scientific content, practical skills and ‘How Science Works’ application.
At AS level there are two main topics; Biology and Disease, and The Variety of Living Things. The former linking ideas about pathogens, disease, and how the human body fights infection, with scientific learning about the digestive, circulatory, and respiratory systems. The latter topic includes subsections on variation, genetics, biochemistry and biodiversity.
In A2 Biology, two more topics are covered; Populations and Environment, and Control in Cells and Organisms. The former includes subsections on photosynthesis and respiration as well as Mendelian genetics and succession. The latter includes sections on homeostasis, the nervous system, muscle structure and function, genetic engineering and gene therapy.

Modules/Units

AS Biology
Unit One: Biology and Disease
The digestive and gas exchange systems are examples of systems in which humans and other mammals exchange substances with their environment. Substances are transported from one part of the body to another by the blood system. An appreciation of the physiology of these systems requires candidates to understand basic principles including the role of enzymes as biological catalysts, and passive and active transport of substances across biological membranes. The systems described in this unit, as well as others in the body, may be affected by disease. Some of these diseases, such as cholera and tuberculosis, may be caused by microorganisms. Other noncommunicable diseases such as many of those affecting heart and lung function also have a significant impact on human health. Knowledge of basic physiology allows us not only to explain symptoms but also to interpret data relating to risk factors. The blood has a number of defensive functions which, together with drugs such as antibiotics, help to limit the spread and effects of disease.
Unit Two: The variety of living organisms
Although a species may be defined in terms of similarity, there is frequently considerable intraspecific variation and this is influenced by genetic and environmental factors. DNA is an information-carrying molecule, and similarities and differences in the sequence of bases in DNA result in genetic diversity.
The variety of life is extensive and is reflected in similarities and differences in its biochemical basis and cellular organisation. Factors such as size and metabolic rate affect the requirements of organisms and this gives rise to adaptations such as specialised exchange surfaces and mass transport systems. Classification is a means of organising the variety of life based on relationships between organisms and is built round the concept of a species. Originally, classification systems were based on observable features but more recent approaches draw on a wider range of evidence to clarify relationships between organisms. Variation that exists at the interspecific level contributes to the biodiversity of communities and ecosystems.
Unit Three: Investigative and practical skills in AS Biology
This unit will address the following aspects of the AS subject criteria. The ability to
• demonstrate and describe ethical, safe and skilful practical techniques, selecting appropriate qualitative and quantitative methods
• make, record and communicate reliable and valid observations and measurements with appropriate precision and accuracy
• analyse, interpret, explain and evaluate the methodology, results and impact of their own and others’ experimental and investigatory activities in a variety of ways.

A2 Biology

Unit Four: Populations and Environment
Living organisms form structured communities within dynamic but essentially stable ecosystems through which energy is transferred and chemical elements are cycled. Humans are part of the ecological balance and their activities affect it both directly and indirectly. Consideration of these effects underpins the content of this unit and should lead to an understanding that sustainability of resources depends on effective management of the conflict between human needs and conservation.
Unit Five: Control in cells and in organisms
Multicellular organisms are able to control the activities of different tissues and organs within their bodies. They do this by detecting stimuli and stimulating appropriate effectors: plants use specific growth factors; animals use hormones, nerve impulses or a combination of both. By responding to internal and external stimuli, animals increase their chances of survival by avoiding harmful environments and by maintaining optimal conditions for their metabolism. Cells are also able to control their metabolic activities by regulating the transcription and translation of their genome. Although the cells within an organism carry the same genetic code, they translate only part of it. In multicellular organisms, this control of translation enables cells to have specialised functions, forming tissues and organs. The sequencing and manipulation of DNA has many medical and technological applications.
Unit Six: Investigative and practical skills in A2 Biology
This unit will address the following aspects of the A2 subject criteria. The ability to
• demonstrate and describe ethical, safe and skilful practical techniques, selecting appropriate qualitative and quantitative methods
• make, record and communicate reliable and valid observations and measurements with appropriate precision and accuracy
• analyse, interpret, explain and evaluate the methodology, results and impact of their own and others’ experimental and investigatory activities in a variety of ways.

How pupils are to be assessed

Unit 1 – Biol 1 – Examination paper (60 raw marks / 100 UMS) 5 – 7 short answer questions plus 2 longer questions (a short comprehension and a structured question requiring continuous prose)
1 hour 15 minutes
33.3% of the total AS marks
16.7% of the total A Level marks

Unit 2 – Biol 2 – Examination paper (85 raw marks / 140 UMS) 5 – 7 short answer questions plus 2 longer questions involving the handling of data and How Science Works 1 hour 45 minutes
46.7% of the total AS marks
23.3% of the total A Level marks

Unit 3 – Bio3x – Externally Marked Route X (50 raw marks/60 UMS) Practical Skills Verification (PSV – teacher verification) Externally Marked Practical Assignment (EMPA – 50 raw marks)
20% of total AS marks
10% of total A Level marks

Unit 4 – Biol 4 – Examination paper (75 raw marks / 100 UMS) 6 – 9 short answer questions plus 2 longer questions involving continuous prose and How Science Works
1 hour 30 minutes
16.7% of the total A Level marks

Unit 5 – Biol 5 – Examination paper (100 raw marks / 140 UMS) 8 – 10 short answer questions plus 2 longer questions (a data-handling question and a synoptic essay – choice of 1 out of 2)
2 hours 15 minutes
23.3% of the total A Level marks

Unit 6 – Bio6x – Externally Marked Route X (50 raw marks/60 UMS) Practical Skills Verification (PSV – teacher verification) Externally Marked Practical Assignment (EMPA – 50 raw marks)
10% of the total A Level marks

Exam Board: AQA

KS5 Chemistry

A summary of the course, its content and key purposes:

Both AS and A level Chemistry splits into 3 sections which are inter-dependent:
• Organic chemistry – the study of chemicals with a carbon backbone used in drugs, plastics & polymers.
• Inorganic chemistry – the study of the elements, learn how to use the periodic table effectively.
• Physical chemistry – explaining the “why’s”, “how’s” “when’s” and “what’s” of chemistry.
• Throughout, practical lessons support the theory work.

Chemistry is a great choice of subject for people who want a career in health and clinical professions, such as medicine, biochemistry, dentistry or forensic science. It will also equip students for a career in industry, for example in the petrochemical or pharmaceutical industries.

The aims of these specifications are to encourage candidates to:
• develop their interest in, and enthusiasm for chemistry, including developing an interest in further study and careers in chemistry;
• appreciate how society makes decisions about scientific issues and how the sciences contribute to the success of the economy and society;
• develop and demonstrate a deeper appreciation of the skills, knowledge and understanding of How Science Works;
• develop essential knowledge and understanding of different areas of chemistry and how they relate to each other.

Modules/Units

At AS students study:
Unit F321 to gain an understanding in Atoms, Bonds and Groups.
Unit F322: Chains, Energy and Resources
Unit F323: Practical Skills in Chemistry 1

The A2 units include:
Unit F324: Rings, Polymers and Analysis
Unit F325: Equilibria, Energetics and Elements and Transition elements
Unit F326: Practical Skills in Chemistry 2

How pupils are to be assessed

Advanced GCE is made up of the three mandatory units at AS and three further mandatory units at A2.
Two of the AS and two of the A2 units are externally assessed by written exams.
The third AS unit F323 and the third A2 unit F326 are internally assessed and will include the assessment of practical skills.

Exam Board: OCR

Unit F321: Atoms, Bonds and Groups
• Atoms and reactions
• Electrons, bonding and structure
• The Periodic Table
Unit F322: Chains, Energy and Resources
• Basic concepts and hydrocarbons
• Alcohols, halogenoalkanes and analysis
• Energy Resources
Unit F323: Practical Skills in Chemistry 1
This AS (practical skills) unit is teacher assessed and externally moderated by OCR.
• Candidates are assessed on one task from each of the following categories: qualitative, quantitative and evaluative tasks.

Unit F324: Rings, Polymers and Analysis
• Rings, acids and amines
• Polymers and synthesis
• Analysis
Unit F325: Equilibria, Energetics and Elements
• Rates, equilibrium and pH
• Energy
• Transition elements
Unit F326: Practical Skills in Chemistry 2
This A2 (practical skills) unit is teacher assessed and externally moderated by OCR.

The weighting of each module towards overall grade:

AS Unit F321: Atoms, Bonds and Groups: 30% of the total AS GCE marks via a 1 hour written paper
AS Unit F322: Chains, Energy and Resources: 50% of the total AS GCE marks 1.75 hour written paper
AS Unit F323: Practical Skills in Chemistry 1
Candidates complete three tasks set by OCR. 20% of the total AS GCE marks is coursework

For students who continue in to the second year:

AS Units as above, Unit F321 being 15% of the total Advanced GCE marks, Unit F322 being 25% of the Advanced GCE marks and Unit F323 being 10% of the Advanced GCE marks.
A2 Unit F324: Rings, Polymers and Analysis
15% of the total Advanced GCE marks 1 h 15 mins written paper
A2 Unit F325: Equilibria, Energetics and Elements 25% of the total Advanced GCE marks 2 h written paper
A2 Unit F326: Practical Skills in Chemistry 2
Candidates complete three tasks set by OCR. 10% of the total Advanced GCE marks

Controlled Assessment

Students can sit a maximum of three qualitative, three quantitative and three evaluative controlled assessments in their first year and the same again in their second year. The best marks from each of the three sections is submitted to the exam board.

KS5 Physics

The specification is divided into several topics, each covering different key concepts of physics;
• Mechanics,
• Electrons, waves, and photons,
• The Newtonian World,
• Fields and particles.

The aims of these specifications are to encourage candidates to:

• Develop their interest in, and enthusiasm for physics, including developing an interest in further study and careers in physics;
• Appreciate how society makes decisions about scientific issues and how the sciences contribute to the success of the economy and society;
• Develop and demonstrate a deeper appreciation of the skills, knowledge and understanding of How Science Works;
• Develop essential knowledge and understanding of different areas of
Physics and how they relate to each other.

Modules/Units

AS Physics
• Mechanics:
Accelerated motion
Kinematics
Vectors.
Work and energy.
• Electron, waves, and photons:
Electric current,
Resistivity,
Waves,
Quantum physics.

A2 Physics
• The Newtonian world:
Newtons laws
Gravitational fields
Oscillations
Thermal properties of materials
• Fields and particles:
Electric and magnetic fields
Radioactivity
Physics in medicine
The universe


How pupils are to be assessed

The AS course consists of 2 terminal exams, and a Controlled assessment.
The A2 course also consists of 2 terminal exams and a Controlled assessment.

Exam Board:
OCR – GCE Physics A (H158 & H558)

Description of each module that also identifies how each module will be assessed:

AS Physics
• G481 – Mechanics: (30% of AS marks, 1 hour written exam, 60 marks)
Accelerated motion
Kinematics
Vectors.
Work and energy.

• G482 – Electron, waves, and photons: (50% of AS marks, 1 h 45 min written exam, 100 marks)
Electric current,
Resistivity,
Waves,
Quantum physics.

• G483 – Practical Skills in Physics 1. (20% of AS marks, 3 set tasks, 40 marks)

A2 Physics

• G484 – The Newtonian world: (30% of A2 marks, 1 h 15 min written exam, 60 marks)
Newtons laws
Gravitational fields
Oscillations
Thermal properties of materials

• G485 – Fields and particles: (50% of A2 marks, 2 hour written exam, 100 marks)
Electric and magnetic fields
Radioactivity
Physics in medicine
The universe

• G485 – The Newtonian world: (20% of A2 marks, 3 set tasks, 40 marks)

Candidates are required to carry out three tasks:
1. Qualitative task
2. Quantitative task
3. Evaluative task

Tasks will be chosen from a selection provided by OCR.

The qualitative and quantitative tasks will test skills of observation and measurement.

Candidates will carry out these tasks under controlled conditions.

Candidates may attempt more than one task from each category with the best mark from each category being used to make up the overall mark.