Music

Curriculum Leader: MISS A BUTTERY

 

Year 7

Pupils have had varied exposure to Music at Primary school so in Year 7 Music we begin by exploring the basic elements of Music through various topics including Film Music and Keyboard work. Other schemes this year include an introduction to Ukulele, “Cops and Robbers” (Musical Theatre scheme), and Music from around the World including Blues and Indian Music.  All schemes allow pupils the opportunity to develop and demonstrate their critical listening skills, performance skills, creative composition skills and manipulation skills (using music technology). Pupils have the opportunity to use different notation through different instruments and will also become familiar with software programs such as Logic Pro and Garageband through the use of the Apple Mac computers.

Modules/Units to be covered and a summary of each with key outcomes:

 

TERM 1A TERM 1B TERM 2A TERM 2B TERM 3A TERM 3B
YEAR 7 Elements of Music Film Music (Graphic Score) An Introduction to the Ukulele Ensemble Performance (cops and Robbers) The Blues Indian Music

How pupils are to be assessed:

Pupils use Peer and self-assessment on a weekly basis in lesson and are given verbal feedback each lesson. At the end of each scheme, pupils are awarded marks for both their written and performance/composition in lesson and set realistic targets for their next scheme.

 

Year 8 

At the end of this academic year, pupils will have had the opportunity to explore fundamental principles of music based on the national curriculum and a continuation of the year 7 programme of study. Schemes of work will give students opportunities to compose, perform and use their critical listening skills. Pupils have explored keyboard techniques, vocal training through singing activities (musicals), instrumental skills on the ukulele, instruments of the orchestra through composition and performance through Taiko drumming (a mixture of martial arts with drumming).

Modules/Units to be covered and a summary of each with key outcomes:

TERM 1A TERM 1B TERM 2A TERM 2B TERM 3A TERM 3B
YEAR 8 Keyboard and Theory Musicals (Performing Arts) Instruments of the Orchestra Ukulele Performance Taiko Drumming MIDI Music Making

How pupils are to be assessed:

Pupils use Peer and self-assessment on a weekly basis in lesson and are given verbal feedback each lesson. At the end of each scheme, pupils are awarded marks for both their written and performance/composition in lesson and set realistic targets for their next scheme.

 

 Year 9

A summary of the course, its content and key purposes:

 

In Year 9 Music explores many new musical concepts and topics enabling students to choose a pathway into KS4 Music and/or Music Technology. Schemes include: Music & Media, Hooks & Riffs (in popular music), Build a Band, World of Music, Samba/Stomp and Modern Dance Music. All schemes allow students the opportunity to develop and demonstrate their critical listening skills, performance skills, creative composition skills and manipulation skills (using music technology). Pupils are assessed on two skills each term through Performance, Composition and Listening.

 

Modules/Units to be covered and a summary of each with key outcomes:

 

TERM 1A TERM 1B TERM 2A TERM 2B TERM 3A TERM 3B
YEAR 9 Music and the Media Hooks and Riffs Musicals Futures  Dance Music Samba/Stomp Reggae

 

 

How pupils are to be assessed:

Pupils use Peer and self-assessment on a weekly basis in lesson and are given verbal feedback each lesson. At the end of each scheme, pupils are awarded marks for both their written and performance/composition in lesson and set realistic targets for their next scheme.

 

KS4- MUSIC  AQA 

A summary of the course, its content and key purposes:

 

The GCSE Music course offers candidates exciting new opportunities for

Performing, composing and appraising their music. Students work through 4 units throughout the year which allows for creativity throughout.

 

The Specification offers:

• a greater weighting given to performing. We know

that most candidates choose music because

they want to perform; we want to reward and

recognise their ability and enthusiasm

• the opportunity to perform individually and in

groups of any size

• the choice of music technology and/or acoustic

music in performing and composing

• a wider choice in composing.

 

Modules/Units to be covered and a summary of each with key outcomes.

The course is split into 4 units with a larger weighting given to Performing.

 

UNIT 1-  LISTENING TO AND APPRAISING MUSIC  (20%) UNIT 2- COMPOSING AND APPRAISING MUSIC  (20%) UNIT 3- PERFORMING MUSIC

(40%)UNIT 4- COMPOSING

MUSIC

(20%)Unit 1 allows students to use the elements of music studied at KS3 to listen to and appraise music. Students will learn key terminology from 5 areas of study ;

AOS1- Rhythm and Metre

AOS 2- Harmony and Tonality

AOS3- Texture and Melody

AOS4- Timbre and Dynamics

AOS5- Structure and Form

Pupils will sit an hour listening paper at the end of Year 11.Pupils will compose their own piece of Music which will be linked to one of the strands studied (dependent on the year)

 

  • -Popular Music
  • -Classical Music
  • -World Music

Pupils will use the Apple Mac computers to compose this.

 

This unit is externally assessed.Pupils will perform two pieces on instrument/s of their choice.

They will perform one Solo piece and an ensemble piece.

Marks will be award for Demand (difficulty of piece), Communication, interpretation and Accuracy.

This unit is internally assessed and moderated.Pupils will compose their own piece of Music from free choice. They will link their piece to two of the AOS mentioned in Unit 1.

This is internally marked and moderated.

 

Exam Board: AQA

 

KS4- MUSIC TECHNOLOGY  

A summary of the course, its content and key purposes:

 

This qualification aims to:

 introduce the basic concepts of music technology that are needed to work within the industry

 introduce the basic concepts and skills of working with audio and MIDI to produce music

 introduce the theory and practice of working with typical music production tools

 develop a significant knowledge core which spans the music technology sector

 provide academic and study skills that will support progression within interactive media and more broadly.

Pupils will learn to confidently use Garage band and Logic Pro on an Apple Mac computer and be able to manipulate and change sound.

The course is split into 4 units

UNIT 1-

Set up and operate a digital audio workstation (25%)UNIT 2

Create music using a digital audio workstation (25%)UNIT 3

Producing Dance Music

(25%)UNIT 4

Sound Design

(25%)

Pupils learn the key differences between audio, MIDI and software instrument and learn to set up Logic Pro for use. Pupils use snapshot evidence and written work for this

This work in internally moderated and check by an external examiner.

Pupils use knowledge from Unit 1 to complete an exam on a brief. Pupils create a piece based on the brief and use written notes to support this.

 

This is a 30 hour controlled assessment exam.

Pupils learn key features of Dance Music and its development including technology, instrumentation, instrumentation and structure.

Pupils use this knowledge to create their track.

 

This work is internally moderated  and checked by an external examiner

Pupils  learn about sound effects and other enhanced sounds used in films and tv programmes.  Using this they create their own music using Logic Pro.

This work is internally moderated  and checked by an external examiner

 

KS5- PERFORMING ARTS 

A summary of the course, its content and key purposes:

A-Level Performing Arts aim to encourage candidates to develop broad skills, knowledge and understanding of the performing arts sectors. The term vocational is used to characterise learning approaches and activities that are work-related – in other words reflecting the current working practices, constraints and preoccupations of professionals in the performing arts industry. All specifications aim to prepare candidates for further study or training in performing arts related occupations. To this end, candidates are to have opportunities to develop appropriate materials (such as portfolios, show reels, photos or audition pieces) that support progression.

Candidates are able to choose either the Performance (singing/acting/dancing) or Production (lighting/sound/stage management/costume) pathway and will work together as a whole team on productions and performances.

In addition, the aims of these specifications are to develop ways of working that encourage candidates to:

  • -Develop their skills, technique and work attitudes to a standard that allows progression to further training or work;
  • -Apply working methods used by professionals as individuals and in teams as well as with audiences and commissioners;
  • -Independently explore through creative and reflective experimentation how meaning is communicated;
  • -Emphasise practical independence, self-management and improving performance over time.

Modules/Units to be covered and a summary of each with key outcomes:

 

AS-LEVEL

G380-  INVESTIGATING PERFORMING ARTS ORGANISATIONS

(Equally weighted)G381- SKILLS DEVELOPMENT

 

(Equally weighted)G382/3- PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE

(PERFORMANCE OR PRODUCTION)

 

(Equally weighted)This unit will help candidates understand how ‘the business’ works and the range of roles within an organisation. In order to do this, candidates will study the scope of performing arts industries and the way in which they operate. The businesses may be performance-based or production-based; they may target a generic application of the business or a specific area appropriate to a particular community or society.

Candidates will produce a case study of two contrasting organisations (between 2000 and 3000 words) and an individual presentation that investigates one particular role within one of the organisations.

 

(Internally moderated)In this unit candidates have the opportunity to follow either of the two pathways (performance or production) as they develop their professional practice and explore new skills in their specialist art form or technical area using existing repertoire.

If candidates are following the performance pathway, they evaluate the level and range of their technical skills and identify exercises, activities and pieces that will help to develop and extend their abilities. In some art forms, graded examinations are available and candidates may find it useful to assess their abilities in relation to these as they may provide guidance and direction in planning their progress.

If candidates are following the production pathway, they identify their skills and experience in operations that support and enrich performance work and outline opportunities for the acquisition of knowledge and experience in their area of interest.

(internally moderated)In Unit G381: Professional practice: skills development candidates acquired and developed practical skills in their specialist area. Candidates will now apply these in their professional practice as they work to put on a group performance based on existing repertoire. This will be a ‘live’ piece of performance work where candidates will aspire to professional standards as they perform as part of a group in front of an audience.

The performance piece will be selected by the group with guidance. Candidates will perform an existing piece, e.g. dance performance, musical, scripted play etc. but they will adapt the piece to suit the range of performance skills they have available in their group. Everyone in the group will, individually, keep a working diary of the process (which will also include details of safety procedures).

(This unit is marked by a visiting examiner)

 

A-LEVEL

G384- GETTING WORK

 

(equally weighted)G385- EXPLORING REPETOIRE

(equally weighted)G386- PRODUCING YOUR SHOWCASE

(equally weighted)This unit helps candidates to learn more about current working practices in the business and will prepare them for further study or training in performing arts-related occupations. Candidates will have opportunities to discuss professional practice with people who currently make their living in performing arts and the opportunity to evaluate and learn from their experience. Candidates will explore and appraise their experience of ‘getting work’ and apply it as the basis of their own action planning.

People in this sector often develop a career as ‘portfolio’ workers, undertaking a range of jobs – arts administration, dance, music, drama or technical work. Being able to support yourself and promote your work are central skills to finding and getting work in the performing arts.

(internally moderated)For this unit candidates will be expected to have already developed a level of skills and be expected to demonstrate effective professional practice in their working methods and in their two pieces of finished work.

Candidates will work as a company to produce or perform two contrasting pieces of practical work. This practical work will be based on two contrasting pieces from the huge repertoire of material available, one contemporary and one historical.

Candidates will produce:

  • -a short written commentary (approximately 1500 words on each piece of repertoire) that shows their research into, and understanding of, the social, historical and cultural dimensions of the two styles they have studied and how they have used this knowledge in their practical work;
  • -a recorded evidence realisation (chaptered DVD) of two significant extracts from contrasting pieces (minimum of 20 minutes and a maximum of 45 minutes per extract) showing their ability to take responsibility for their own company role and their understanding of suitable approaches in response to direction.

(internally moderated)

Candidates will produce and present a Showcase (maximum 15 mins in total) containing two contrasting solo pieces chosen by them (from existing repertoire) and a duologue, duet, duo or pas de deux in which they perform with one other person.

Candidates will also produce and present their preparatory notes (in written, oral, visual or electronic form) recording each stage of their preparation for this Showcase, including evidence of their supporting research. Candidates will discuss these with the visiting examiner before presenting their Showcase.

(A visiting examiner will mark this unit)