History

Curriculum Leader: E RICKARDS

Click Here to view the November 2015 History newsletter.

Year 8 

History is taught thematically in years 8 and 9. In term one pupils learn about aspects of everyday life throughout history, in term two ‘power and protest’ and in term three ‘war and peace’.

Everyday Life:

  • The Big Picture of Everyday Life – when were the best and worst times to live?
  • The medieval town and village.
  • The Black Death
  • Tudor rich and poor.
  • Industrial towns

 

Power and Protest:

  • Big Picture Monarchy, 1066-1649
  • Monarch case studies e.g. King John, Elizabeth I and King Charles.

 

War and Peace:

  • The Norman Conquest and the Battle of Hastings
  • The development of castles.
  • The English Civil War.

 

How pupils are to be assessed:  Pupils are assessed each half term. They are assessed on their knowledge and historical skills.

History helps students to develop a number of new skills including: History helps students to develop a number of new skills including:

  • Ask questions properly
  • Express your own opinions
  • Process information
  • Think independently
  • Structure arguments
  • Understand the views of others

 

Year 9

History is taught thematically in years 8 and 9. In term one pupils learn about aspects of everyday life throughout history, in term two ‘power and protest’ and in term three ‘war and peace’.

Everyday Life:

  • Mini Medicine Through Time
  • Mini Crime & Punishment Through Time

Power and Protest:

  • How Revolutionary was Britain in the C19th?
  • Protest in the C20th: e.g. Votes for Women

War and Peace:

  • The First World War
  • The Second World War
  • The Holocaust

Pupils are assessed each half term. They are assessed on their knowledge and historical skills.

 

KS4 

History helps students to develop a number of new skills including: History helps students to develop a number of new skills including:

  • Ask questions properly
  • Express your own opinions
  • Process information
  • Think independently
  • Structure arguments
  • Understand the views of others

Levels of Qualification

GCSE (A* – G)

Course Description

The SHP syllabus allows students to study developments in Crime and Punishment from 500BC – 1945 and an in- depth study of Germany, 1919-1945.

The key questions in the crime and punishment unit include:

  • What different kinds of crime were committed in different periods?
  • How have ideas about the nature of crime, the causes of crime and the nature of punishment changed?
  • Who determined the laws and punishments?
  • How effective were law enforcement and punishments in preventing crime? Topics include: Attitudes towards women and crime & punishment in the Middle Ages.
  • The Witch craze in the seventeenth century.
  • Prison reform in the nineteenth century.
  • An in-depth study of Germany (1919 – 1945)

Students who choose history are opting for an academic subject which is valued as such in the wider world. Moreover, it is a subject that most pupils enjoy and one which can serve as an introduction to skills which will prove invaluable in later life.

 

Knowledge and Skills

History helps students to develop a number of new skills including: History helps students to develop a number of new skills including:

  • Ask questions properly
  • Express your own opinions
  • Process information
  • Think independently
  • Structure arguments
  • Understand the views of others

Assessment

The course is assessed by two examinations papers worth 75% of the total mark. The final 25% of the marks available will be awarded to a controlled assessment.

 

Controlled assessment

Takes the form of a 2000 word assignment based on a study of Conwy castle.

 

Homework

Extension work based on current topic.

 

Progress Routes

History gives knowledge and skills which will prepare students for higher education, and which are also useful in any career. Students who specialise in history can go on to become historical researchers, work in museums, galleries, libraries or become teachers. But history also supports other career paths, like journalism, politics, law, social work and public services.

The Higher Education Statistical Agency places History in the top five disciplines in terms of successful employability.

 

History B (Modern World)

Levels of Qualification

GCSE (A* – G)

 

Course Description

The GCSE History Modern World Syllabus is designed to allow students to gain, through a study of the  main  developments  in  international  relations

since 1945, an historical perspective on some of the main issues facing the contemporary world.

Students will study Britain and Germany in-depth. The syllabus also enhances students understanding of societies different in time and place from our own.

The syllabus content includes:

  • International relations (1945 – 1975)
  • An in-depth study of Germany (1919 – 1945)
  • A depth study of Britain (1890 – 1919) Topics include: Votes for Women
  • Britain during the First World War
  • Weimar and Nazi Germany
  • The causes of the Second World War

Students who choose history are opting for an academic subject which is valued as such in the wider world. Moreover, it is a subject that most pupils enjoy and one which can serve as an introduction to skills which will prove invaluable in later life.

 

Knowledge and Skills

History helps students to develop a number of new skills including:

  • Ask questions properly
  • Express your own opinions
  • Process information
  • Think independently
  • Structure arguments
  • Understand the views of others

 

Assessment

The course is assessed by two examinations papers worth 75% of the total mark. The final 25% of the marks available will be awarded to a controlled assessment.

 

Controlled assessment

This takes the form of a 2000 word assignment based on the Civil Rights movement in the USA.

 

Homework

Extension work based on current topic.

 

Progress Routes

History gives knowledge and skills which will prepare students for higher education, and which are also useful in any career. Students who specialise in history can go on to become historical researchers, work in museums, galleries, libraries or become teachers. But history also supports other career paths, like journalism, politics, law, social work and public services.

The Higher Education Statistical Agency places History in the top five disciplines in terms of successful employability.