Design Technology

Subject: Technology

Curriculum Leader: B Bewes

Year 7

Through a variety of creative and practical activities, pupils should be taught the knowledge, understanding and skills needed to engage in an iterative process of designing and making. They should work in a range of domestic and local contexts [for example, the home, health, leisure and culture], and industrial contexts [for example, engineering, manufacturing, construction, energy, agriculture (including horticulture)

When designing and making, pupils should be taught to:

Design

  • Use research and exploration, such as the study of different cultures, to identify and understand user needs
  • Identify and solve their own design problems and understand how to reformulate problems given to them
  • Develop specifications to inform the design of innovative, functional, appealing products that respond to needs in a variety of situations
  • Use a variety of approaches [for example, bio mimicry and user-centered design], to generate creative ideas and avoid stereotypical responses
  • Develop and communicate design ideas using annotated sketches, detailed plans, 3-D and mathematical modelling, oral and digital presentations and computer-based tools

Make

  • Select from and use specialist tools, techniques, processes, equipment and machinery precisely, including computer-aided manufacture
  • Select from and use a wider, more complex range of materials, components and ingredients, taking into account their properties

Evaluate

  • Analyse the work of past and present professionals and others to develop and broaden their understanding
  • Investigate new and emerging technologies
  • Test, evaluate and refine their ideas and products against a specification, taking into account the views of intended users and other interested groups
  • Understand developments in design and technology, its impact on individuals, society and the environment, and the responsibilities of designers, engineers and technologies

Baseline test We baseline assess all are year 7 pupils in order to gain further knowledge and understanding of what each different primary school has been delivering at KS2. We can use this to further tailor the needs and experiences of the pupils throughout year 7.

Design Technology

H/S Introduction – We get the pupils to complete an H/S booklet, most of the contents is aimed at their new environment and general expectations of being in a Technology room.

Graphics introduction – We cover some drawing basics in this unit such as; Block colour, rendering, fonts, word art, 1 and 2 point perspective.

Key ring project (Acrylic) – This is a design and make project where pupils will build subject knowledge on Plastics. They will receive a design brief, research existing products, design a interesting shape and decorate. These key rings will be cut out using the Laser cutter and hand finished using hand tools and polishing machine.  Products will have a high quality finish.

Picture frame project (Timber) – This is the 2nd design and make unit where pupils will build subject knowledge of woods. There is more emphasis on hand tool skill and marking and measuring. Pupils will use CAD/CAM to produce a high quality and demanding outcome.

How pupils are to be assessed:

Design Technology – Latterly, pupils follow the design process in order to research, analyze, design and develop their choices. These elements will be marked and feedback given on what went well and also how to improve each area.

The manufacture of their final practical is an assessed piece of work demonstrating the knowledge and expertise acquired throughout the project.

Year 8

Through a variety of creative and practical activities, pupils should be taught the knowledge, understanding and skills needed to engage in an iterative process of designing and making. They should work in a range of domestic and local contexts [for example, the home, health, leisure and culture], and industrial contexts [for example, engineering, manufacturing, construction, energy, agriculture (including horticulture)

When designing and making, pupils should be taught to:

Design

  • Use research and exploration, such as the study of different cultures, to identify and understand user needs
  • Identify and solve their own design problems and understand how to reformulate problems given to them
  • Develop specifications to inform the design of innovative, functional, appealing products that respond to needs in a variety of situations
  • Use a variety of approaches [for example, bio mimicry and user-centred design], to generate creative ideas and avoid stereotypical responses
  • Develop and communicate design ideas using annotated sketches, detailed plans, 3-D and mathematical modelling, oral and digital presentations and computer-based tools

Make

  • Select from and use specialist tools, techniques, processes, equipment and machinery precisely, including computer-aided manufacture
  • Select from and use a wider, more complex range of materials, components and ingredients, taking into account their properties

Evaluate

  • Analyse the work of past and present professionals and others to develop and broaden their understanding
  • Investigate new and emerging technologies
  • Test, evaluate and refine their ideas and products against a specification, taking into account the views of intended users and other interested groups
  • Understand developments in design and technology, its impact on individuals, society and the environment, and the responsibilities of designers, engineers and technologies

Modules/Units to be covered and a summary of each with key outcomes:

Design Technology – Throughout the course of this year, pupils have the opportunity to build upon and practice the variety of skills acquired in year 7.

Pupils will design and make a complex wooden inlayed box with integrated mood light; this will have a working L.E.D circuit and pupils will learn some basic electronic component properties.

They will also produce a wooden box to house this circuit using a wide range of and hand tools and processes.

How pupils are to be assessed:

Design Technology – Latterly, pupils follow the design process in order to research, analyze, design and develop their choices. These elements will be marked and feedback given on what went well and also how to improve each area.

The manufacture of their final practical is an assessed piece of work demonstrating the knowledge and expertise acquired throughout the project.

  Year 9

A summary of the course, its content and key purposes:

Through a variety of creative and practical activities, pupils should be taught the

knowledge, understanding and skills needed to engage in an iterative process of designing and making. They should work in a range of domestic and local contexts [for example, the home, health, leisure and culture], and industrial contexts [for example, engineering, manufacturing, construction, energy, agriculture (including horticulture)

When designing and making, pupils should be taught to:

Design

  • Use research and exploration, such as the study of different cultures, to identify and understand user needs
  • Identify and solve their own design problems and understand how to reformulate problems given to them
  • Develop specifications to inform the design of innovative, functional, appealing products that respond to needs in a variety of situations
  • Use a variety of approaches [for example, bio mimicry and user-centred design], to generate creative ideas and avoid stereotypical responses
  • Develop and communicate design ideas using annotated sketches, detailed plans, 3-Dand mathematical modelling, oral and digital presentations and computer-based tools

Make

  • Select from and use specialist tools, techniques, processes, equipment and machinery precisely, including computer-aided manufacture
  • Select from and use a wider, more complex range of materials, components and

ingredients, taking into account their properties

Evaluate

  • Analyse the work of past and present professionals and others to develop and broaden their understanding
  • Investigate new and emerging technologies
  • Test, evaluate and refine their ideas and products against a specification, taking into account the views of intended users and other interested groups
  • Understand developments in design and technology, its impact on individuals, society and the environment, and the responsibilities of designers, engineers and technologies.

Modules/Units to be covered and a summary of each with key outcomes:

Design Technology

Throughout the course of this year, pupils have the opportunity to build upon and practice the variety of skills acquired in year 8.

There are 2 main units of work in Year 9:

Docking station, pupils will build on electronics skills from Y8 and produce a fully functioning Mp3 mono amp circuit. They will also be using the laser and sublimation printer to design and make housing for this circuit that will be designed to meet a client’s needs.

Lighting model making to a Memphis theme, pupils will conduct research on Memphis design movement and some lighting units of their choice. They will they be creative in designing a range of viable outcomes on paper, pupils will then be given a small light source that they will model and develop a final outcome in card, cardboard and foam board.

How pupils are to be assessed:

Design Technology – Latterly, pupils follow the design process in order to research, analyze, design and develop their choices. These elements will be marked and feedback given on what went well and also how to improve each area.

The manufacture of their final practical is an assessed piece of work demonstrating the knowledge and expertise acquired throughout the project.

KS4

A summary of the course, its content and key purposes:

GCSE Design and Technology: Product Design enables students to design and make products with creativity and originality, using a range of materials and techniques.

Packaging, labelling and instructions are encouraged as part of the complete design proposal and advertising, points of sale can be used to supplement the making experience and help create products which can be evaluated for their commercial viability.

This course has 60 per cent controlled assessment in order to recognize the importance of practical work within this subject.

At KS4 students follow the AQA GCSE Design and Technology Product Design course. Pupils will develop an in-depth knowledge of design and manufacturing techniques including CAD/CAM

Modules/Units to be covered and a summary of each with key outcomes:

Mini Projects for Y10 include (Unit 2)

Product Design and Development in a Memphis Design Movement style.

Developing manufacturing skills and exploring how design can be influenced by periods of time, art movements and culture.

African Design Jewellery box

Topic of work around hard woods and inlay techniques

Designing for the Disabled

Exploring the needs of clients and users as well as technical data and dimensions to influence design.

Mobile phone holder and laser cutting

Working as teams following industrial practices such as batch production and Quality Control checks. This will also explore packaging and suitability of design for a commercial product.

Lighting unit, for a client and focus on a specific designer of their choice.

Exploring the needs of a client and also linking work to a specific designer, work will be in mixed materials with as many material choices made by the pupil as possible.

Theory to be covered also in preparation for exam. Unit 2

Year 11 controlled assessment

Unit 2: Design and Make Practice

An externally set theme will provide a starting point for students to investigate, design, model and develop an idea into a final, fully manufactured and packaged product suitable for a commercial market. A portfolio of work will support the final manufactured outcome.

Unit 1: Written Exam Paper

Pre-released theme will be given to aid research (often around a particular topic such as Design Movement or item of furniture). Followed by series of questions and design tasks assessing the knowledge and understanding of the processes and techniques which aid manufacture and of the commercial and industrial applications of a range of materials involved in manufacturing their products in quantity.

How pupils are to be assessed:

Mini projects will be assessed regularly using GCSE criteria

Knowledge checks will be held every Half term using previous exam questions and mark schemes.

An official Mock exam will be completed under exam conditions.

Across all year groups, pupils are arranged in mixed ability groupings. They are allocated individual workstations although they have to share large pieces of equipment (e.g. the cooker) and vice areas. This promotes team working and facilitates social interactions. Pupils collaborate well to ensure that the job gets done.

Throughout the scheme, pupils have the opportunity to work independently, in pairs and groups. They are encouraged to discuss their ideas and to nominate a group spokesperson for some activities. They have to explain and justify their opinions verbally before feeding back to the whole class. Ground rules are established within the first few weeks so pupils subscribe to “their” class rules and therefore respect the views of others even where they are different to their own. Pupils are encouraged to self and peer assess pieces of work both written, design and practical tasks, recognizing the strengths of others and respecting their feelings when suggesting improvements.

Exam Board: AQA

The weighting of each module towards overall grade:

60% controlled assessment and 40% exam

KS5

NA